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Books and Guides

David Henderson examines the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) doctrine, subjecting it to fundamental criticisms. In this controversial text he argues that, far from being harmless, its adoption threatens prosperity in poor countries as well as rich. It is likely to reduce competition and economic freedom and to undermine the market economy.

Case Studies

This report presents an evaluation of social return for the BeHealthy Programme (BHP) implemented by the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) in Russia with the financial support of the Mondelēz International Foundation (MIF). The programme is part of the Mondelēz Global Community Partnership Initiative to promote active, healthy lifestyles – a critical component of the company’s wellbeing mission.

The evaluation measures the impact of the BHP over a seven-year period (2008-2014) in three schools located in three different Russian regions where the programme was implemented: school no. 18 in Novgorod, Ropsha school (Leningrad region) and school no. 2 in Sobinka (Vladimir region).

Mondelēz International is a global snacking powerhouse and the company behind many of the world’s best-known snack brands including Oreo, Cadbury and Toblerone.

Their ‘Be Healthy’ programme was launched almost 10 years ago, read the SROI case study.

Impact Reports

This report presents an evaluation of social return for the BeHealthy Programme (BHP) implemented by the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) in Russia with the financial support of the Mondelēz International Foundation (MIF). The programme is part of the Mondelēz Global Community Partnership Initiative to promote active, healthy lifestyles – a critical component of the company’s wellbeing mission.

The evaluation measures the impact of the BHP over a seven-year period (2008-2014) in three schools located in three different Russian regions where the programme was implemented: school no. 18 in Novgorod, Ropsha school (Leningrad region) and school no. 2 in Sobinka (Vladimir region).

Tools

ICT sector companies are working together to improve the practice of sustainability and social responsibility within their supply chains. To this end, the GeSI Supply Chain Working Group has teamed with the Electronic Industry Code of Conduct (EICC) Implementation Group and other groups to develop a set of tools that satisfy broad industry needs. These tools include this questionnaire, a risk assessment tool, a common approach to auditing, and additional web- based resources. Deployment and use of this Self Assessment Questionnaire is expected to benefit both industrial customers and their suppliers by:

– Raising supplier awareness about the importance of sustainability principles
– Clarifying ICT customer expectations regarding their suppliers’ sustainability practices
– Supporting ICT customer assessments of supplier characteristics and potential risks
– Enabling suppliers to evaluate, improve, and communicate their performance
– Reducing the burden on suppliers of responding to multiple questionnaires

Working Papers and Research

If the purpose of social investment is to use capital in order to effect positive social change, then delivering and evidencing that positive change must be at the core of what social investors do.

This report by Investing for Good, reports on how 10 UK leading social investors incorporate social impact in screening and assessing investments as well as how transactions are priced and structured and investment decisions made. It also provides a useful overview of the current state of impact measurement practices in the social finance sector and the practical challenges that investors are facing. There was variance amongst the approaches taken by the 10 investors with some taking a “system-driven” approach and others a less formal one; reliant on discussions, narratives and a deep understanding of the risks in the market.

This paper by Elise Wach from the Institute of Development Studies analyses some of the current approaches and frameworks for evaluating ‘Inclusive Business’ impacts. It finds that while they shed light on the complex network of effects that businesses have and the ways in which some firms are attempting to contribute to development, they are unable to provide information about the actual impacts of business activities. More, higher quality, and less partial ‘Inclusive Business’ evaluations are needed to better enable us to harness the potential for business to contribute positively to development.

This discussion paper, by Tim Dixon with Andrea Colantonio and David Shiers at the Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development (OISD), examines the evolution of the concepts of Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) (or Responsible Investment (RI)) and Responsible Property Investment (RPI) and compares their meanings with Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) (or Corporate Responsibility (CR)) and Corporate Governance (CG) within the context of the wider sustainability agenda. The increasing emphasis of financial institutions and private sector real estate developers to focus on urban regeneration projects in the UK and Europe is examined in the context of (1) the growth of public and private partnership arrangements (PPPs), one of a range of joint venture and partnership vehicles which have emerged, and (2) real estate asset allocation by financial institutions as part of a diversified investment portfolio.