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Books and Guides

사회적 가치의 일곱가지 원칙은 사회적 가치에 대한 책임 및 이의 측정과 관리를 위한 원칙 기반 틀이라 할 수 있다. 이 원칙들은 2009년에 처음 개발되었으며 SROI와 사회적 영향 분석가 협회(Social Impact Analysts Association)의 합병 이후 2015년에 개정되었다. 본 보고서는 이러한 원칙을 뒷받침하고 있는 생각에 대한 설명이다.

The results of the 2016 Social Value International survey on the understanding and use of the Social Value Principles.

If you already know what difference you make – and you can prove it, this guide is not for you. And if you are an experienced evaluator with an understanding of cost-benefit analysis, you will find it too basic. (Have a look at the SROI Network’s “Guide to Social Return on Investment” instead). But if you want to understand more about how your organisation makes an impact – and how much this matters – then read on.

This supplement highlights some of the issues around the links between SROI and commissioning policy.

This supplement explains how SROI can be used by investors if they want to integrate SROI approaches into investment decisions.

Supplementary Guidance document that accompanies “A Guide to Social Return on Investment (2012) and focuses on Principle 2. Within the context of all of the Principles of Social Value, “understand what changes” is pivotal. It is so closely intertwined with many of the other principles that it is essential it is applied well. The aim of the guidance is to help you know how to collect the information you need about ‘changes’ and how to analyse this information in order to produce a set of well-defined outcomes. This guidance is essential for anyone looking to maximise value and increase well-being, equality, and environmental stability.

The purpose of stakeholder involvement is to reduce the risk that an analysis of change arising from an organisations activities misstates the change. The principle says that involvement is required to ‘inform what gets measured and how this is measured and valued by involving stakeholders. The focus of this supplement is on involvement in general and not on the specifics of what is measured, or how it is measured or valued.

This supplement expands the guidance in relation to determining materiality in SROI analyses that would be made public.

A blank, Excel template of the impact map to help calculate social value.

2012 edition of the Guide to Social Return on Investment

Social Value UK provide assurance on behalf of Social Value International that tests reports for a good understanding and application of Social Value Principles and process.
The criteria set out in this document can be applied to any social value/impact report. However, to assure an SROI report, Principle 3 “Value the things that matter” requires the use of financial proxies.

The Seven Principles of Social Value are a principle based framework for accounting for, measuring and managing social value.

The Principles were originally developed in 2009 and were updated in 2015 following the merger of the SROI Network and the Social Impact Analysts Association. This report explains the thinking that underpins these Principles.

This handbook was written by Jaan Aps, of the Estonian Social Enterprise Network, with the help of the Erasmus+ program. It covers steps for developing a theory of change and how to use stories to test this theory.

Evaluation has the ability to provide a wealth of information for grantmakers, as well as the organizations and communities they serve, to learn from. When done well, evaluation increases the capacity and improves performance of grantees. GEO provides funders with best practices to incorporate evaluation into their grantmaking through “four essentials:” Lead, Plan, Organize and Share.

This presentation from the British Council demonstrates how they evaluate impact. It includes indicators, a logic model and examples of data collection.

Published by: , , 2012

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Network of Networks for Impact Evaluation (NONIE) is was formed to promote quality impact evaluation. NONIE fosters a program of impact evaluation activities based on a common understanding of the meaning of impact evaluation and approaches to conducting impact evaluation. By sharing methodological approaches and promoting learning by doing on
impact evaluations, NONIE aims to promote the use of this more specific approach by its members within their larger portfolio of evaluations. This guide from the World Bank by Frans Leeuw, Maastricht University, and Jos Vaessen, Maastricht University and University of Antwerp, was developed to support this focus.

Published by: , , 2009

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Case Studies

This report presents an evaluation of social return for the BeHealthy Programme (BHP) implemented by the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) in Russia with the financial support of the Mondelēz International Foundation (MIF). The programme is part of the Mondelēz Global Community Partnership Initiative to promote active, healthy lifestyles – a critical component of the company’s wellbeing mission.

The evaluation measures the impact of the BHP over a seven-year period (2008-2014) in three schools located in three different Russian regions where the programme was implemented: school no. 18 in Novgorod, Ropsha school (Leningrad region) and school no. 2 in Sobinka (Vladimir region).

Mondelēz International is a global snacking powerhouse and the company behind many of the world’s best-known snack brands including Oreo, Cadbury and Toblerone.

Their ‘Be Healthy’ programme was launched almost 10 years ago, read the SROI case study.

EVPA, the membership body for European organisations engaged in social impact investment or venture philanthropy, release two in depth case studies investigating impact measurement in funding organisations.

External Databases and Resources

The world’s most comprehensive, free access point for evidence to support policy makers, stakeholders and researchers interested in how to strengthen or reform health systems or in how to get cost-effective programs, services and drugs to those who need them.

A database of resources for Evaluators can be found on the Irish Evaluation Network pages of the School of Education Studies, Dublin City University website.

It’s not easy to measure the impact of development research in bringing about positive change. It’s even harder to show how communications efforts, and expenditure, helps to achieve both research objectives, and development outcomes. This section of Research to Action’s (R2A) website aims to offer key resources and insights to help support better monitoring and evaluation of research uptake activities.

Crisis commissions external researchers to independently evaluate our projects and the services they offer, as well as to produce good practice guides on a range of topics.

BetterEvaluation is an international collaboration to improve evaluation practice and theory by sharing information about options (methods or tools) and approaches.

The good evaluation of a project or a policy needs on the one hand thorough application of methodology up to the highest professional standards and is on the other hand a creative thought exercise: what do we really want to know and how to find out.

This resource provides information on the methodologies behind how the European Commission (EC) evaluates their projects or policies. It includes:

– Evaluation guides: for the geographical and thematic evaluations, for evaluation managers or evaluators and for project and programme evaluations, including checklists
– Methodological bases: subject, timing, utilisation, roles, method
– Tools: to structure an evaluation, to collect and analyse data, to assist the formulation of judgements
– Impact diagrams/indicators: a set of intervention logics, outlining key chains of results and a menu of example indicators for some key EC intervention sectors
– Overall assessment: the development of these documents has been accompanied by a group of international evaluation experts.

The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) is an independent grant-making charity dedicated to breaking the link between family income and educational achievement, ensuring that children from all backgrounds can fulfill their potential and make the most of their talents.

The EEF exists to fund, develop and evaluate cost-effective and replicable projects which address educational disadvantage.

Their focus is on supporting projects that show promising evidence of having a measurable impact on attainment or a directly related outcome. We are interested in testing projects’ effectiveness through robust independent evaluations, wherever possible as randomized controlled trials. If they are shown to have an impact, they should be able to be replicated and scaled up to improve outcomes for other disadvantaged pupils.

Impact Reports

This report presents an evaluation of social return for the BeHealthy Programme (BHP) implemented by the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) in Russia with the financial support of the Mondelēz International Foundation (MIF). The programme is part of the Mondelēz Global Community Partnership Initiative to promote active, healthy lifestyles – a critical component of the company’s wellbeing mission.

The evaluation measures the impact of the BHP over a seven-year period (2008-2014) in three schools located in three different Russian regions where the programme was implemented: school no. 18 in Novgorod, Ropsha school (Leningrad region) and school no. 2 in Sobinka (Vladimir region).

EVPA, the membership body for European organisations engaged in social impact investment or venture philanthropy, release two in depth case studies investigating impact measurement in funding organisations.

Opinion and Comment

The results of the 2016 Social Value International survey on the understanding and use of the Social Value Principles.

AEA365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and is dedicated to highlighting Hot Tips, Cool Tricks, Rad Resources, and Lessons Learned for evaluators.

Tools

The results of the 2016 Social Value International survey on the understanding and use of the Social Value Principles.

Training and Courses

The Charities Evaluation Services (CES) are leading experts on providing high quality training to help you to develop your work on monitoring, evaluation and quality improvement. CES offers a variety of training courses including courses on PQASSO, Theory of Change, outcomes, impact measurement and practical skills.

The Fund Raising School, an international leader in fundraising training and professional development, and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University, a nationally ranked leader in nonprofit management education, offer the Program Evaluation for Mission Impact course at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). It is one of four required courses for the new Certificate in Nonprofit Executive Leadership. This course focuses on the techniques and application of evaluation methods to assess the effectiveness of nonprofit programs.

Working Papers and Research

The results of the 2016 Social Value International survey on the understanding and use of the Social Value Principles.

The SROI method and investments impact.
Cuadernos de la Asociación Española de Fundaciones DICIEMBRE 2011

Hugo Narrillos.
Economista. Coordinador en España de The SROI Network (www.thesroinetwork.org).

This paper from Nominet Trust, by Dan Sutch and Kieron Kirkland, explores the meaningful metrics that social tech ventures can use to evaluate the social impact of their work.

To ensure it supports the growth of the social tech venture, evaluation must be purposeful. This purpose comes from identifying, articulating and then evidencing the social, user and financial value of the venture and doing so with the appropriate metrics. These three values are explored in The Triple Helix of Social Innovation.

This report by nef consulting uses an extended Social Cost-Benefit Analysis (SCBA) to compare and contrast the benefits and investment of CARE International’s Adaptation Learning Programme (ALP) in Dakoro, Niger.

The report is available in French and English.

How to monitor and evaluate advocacy work as part of development interventions is a significant challenge faced by many advocates. So what are some of the possible solutions? Building on a series of papers, conferences, training and learning from INTRAC consultancy work, this paper aims to share and learn from an INTRAC monitoring and evaluation (M&E) workshop held in 2013. It draws on four case studies presented at this workshop and offers eight key points that organisations should consider when designing an advocacy M&E system, as well as an annotated list of resources and reading materials.

This paper by Elise Wach from the Institute of Development Studies analyses some of the current approaches and frameworks for evaluating ‘Inclusive Business’ impacts. It finds that while they shed light on the complex network of effects that businesses have and the ways in which some firms are attempting to contribute to development, they are unable to provide information about the actual impacts of business activities. More, higher quality, and less partial ‘Inclusive Business’ evaluations are needed to better enable us to harness the potential for business to contribute positively to development.